Tag Archives: conversation project

The Conversation Project: Life in Bangladesh

Bangladesh rickshaw

Rickshaw in Bangladesh

The Conversation Project, presented by Oregon Humanities, continues on Wednesday, March 31, with a conversation on “Life in a Mega City: Images of Urban Bangladesh.” This conversation will be presented by photographer Geoffrey Hiller for free from 6:30-8:00  p.m. in the Library’s Oak Room.

About the Conversation:

Bangladesh, which is the size of Wisconsin, is home to more than 150 million inhabitants, including 15 million in the capital city of Dhaka alone. The country is also the fifth- largest exporter to the U.S. of ready-made garments, which are made by a largely female workforce whose hourly wages are lower than those in China, India, Indonesia, or Mexico. Considered one of twenty-two mega cities in the world, Dhaka continues to reinvent itself on a weekly basis as new industries spring up and rural citizens flock to the city for jobs and opportunities.

Through slides, videos, and stories, photojournalist and Fulbright Scholar Geoffrey Hiller will lead a conversation about the reasons for and challenges associated with the growth of mega cities, the differences between Bangladeshi and American culture, and the connections between our consumer choices and a global work force.

About the presenter:

Geoffrey Hiller’s photography has been published in the United States, Europe, and Japan in such publications as Geo, Newsweek, Mother Jones, and The New York Times Magazine. His photo-essays have covered Asia, Latin America, Europe, and West Africa. He was on the staff of the Brazilian edition of National Geographic for two years. Hiller’s award-winning multimedia projects about Vietnam, eastern Europe, Ghana, Burma, and Brazil have earned recognition from Adobe, the Soros Foundation, Apple, The Christian Science Monitor, and USA Today. He has also developed web projects for Tektronix, Xerox, Canon, and the National Press Photographers Association. Hiller was a Fulbright Scholar between 2008 and 2009, photographing and teaching interactive media in Dhaka, Bangladesh. He maintains two blogs: www.banglaphoto.wordpress.com, about his work in Bangladesh, and www.vervephoto.wordpress.com, where he edits the work of contemporary documentary photographers.

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The Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. Conversations are facilitated by some of Oregon’s most respected humanities scholars.

For more information, contact John Smith at 503-570-1594.

The Conversation Project: Your Land, My Land

Professor Veronica Dujon

Prof. Veronica Dujon

The Conversation Project, presented by Oregon Humanities, continues on Wednesday, March 3, with a conversation on “Your Land, My Land: Using and Preserving Oregon’s Natural Resources”. This conversation will be presented by Portland State University Professor Veronica Dujon for free from 6:30-8:00  p.m. in the Library’s Oak Room.

About the conversation:

Oregonians are known for a fierce sense of independence and a rugged individuality, qualities long associated with natural resource vocations such as logging, fishing, farming, and ranching. The state is also known for its progressive environmental policies. Our sense of connection to a place informs our values and our approaches to conflict over resource and land use in our communities.

Veronica Dujon, whose research focuses on gillnet fishermen on the Lower Columbia and the conflict over water rights in the Klamath Basin, invites you to consider the various meanings we in Oregon have come to attach to different places in the state and to explore how these attachments shape our desire to both use and preserve our natural resources.

About the presenter:

Veronica Dujon is professor and chair of the department of sociology at Portland State University. She teaches, researches, and publishes in the areas of environmental sociology with a focus on contests over declining natural resources, sociology of globalization, and women in the global economy. One of her major research interests is how to build socially sustainable societies. She has published widely and is co-editor of the volume Understanding the Social Dimension of Sustainability (Routledge, 2009). In Oregon, her research focuses on the conflict over water rights in the Klamath Basin and the adaptation strategies of gillnet fishermen on the Lower Columbia as they respond to declining salmon runs. Dujon received her bachelor’s degree from the University of the West Indies, Barbados, and her master’s and doctoral degrees in land resources/sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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The Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. Conversations are facilitated by some of Oregon’s most respected humanities scholars.

For more information, contact John Smith at 503-570-1594.

The Conversation Project: Portrait of Life in Iraq

The Conversation Project, presented by Oregon Humanities, continues on Wednesday, February 10, with a conversation on “Night of a Thousand Stars: Portrait of Life in Iraq.” This conversation will be presented by photojournalist Joel Preston Smith for free from 6:30-8:00  p.m. in the Library’s Oak Room.

About the conversation:

Photojournalist Joel Preston Smith traveled in central and northern Iraq for four months in 2003, living with Iraqis and Kurds and patrolling with U.S. soldiers. This slide show and conversation offer a comprehensive portrait of Iraqi society before and after the U.S. invasion in 2003, as seen from the perspectives of both Iraqis and U.S. soldiers. Smith will lead audiences in a conversation about the ethics of war, media bias, and American perceptions of Iraqis and Middle Easterners.

About the presenter:

Joel Preston Smith is a freelance writer, photographer, and artist based in Portland. Born in Liberty, West Virginia, Smith has served as a photojournalist in the U.S. Army and as a civilian on humanitarian aid missions to Rwanda, Honduras, Palestine, and Iraq. His work has been published in Gobshite Quarterly, The Irish Times, The Oregonian, and others. He is also the author of a book of essays and photographs, Night of a Thousand Stars and Other Portraits of Iraq (Nazraeli Press, 2006).

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The Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. Conversations are facilitated by some of Oregon’s most respected humanities scholars.

For more information, contact John Smith at 503-570-1594.

The Conversation Project: Borderless

The Conversation Project, presented by Oregon Humanities, continues on Wednesday, January 20, with a conversation on “Borderless: Migration, Globalization, and Changing Communities.” This conversation will be presented by Lewis and Clark University Professor Elliott Young for free from 6:30-8:00  p.m. in the Library’s Oak Room.

About the conversation:

In this time of cataclysmic change in our country and our world, it is important to ask not just how to get the economy back on track, but what kind of economy we want. In 1983, Benedict Anderson wrote Imagined Communities, a book about the origins of the modern nation-state and the powerful identification with nations for which millions have fought and been willing to die. Elliott Young will lead a discussion about the ways in which local communities in the twenty-first century need to think in new ways about the relationship between migration and globalization, and their effects on Oregon communities.

About the presenter:

Elliott Young was born in New York City and has been migrating westward ever since. He has conducted research and done community development work in Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and Ecuador. Young has been a professor of Latin American and borderlands history at Lewis & Clark College in Portland since 1997. He has directed the college’s Latin American Studies program and currently serves as chair of the history department and director of the ethnic studies program. He has published Catarino Garza’s Revolution on the Texas-Mexico Border (Duke University Press, 2004), which examines the little known story of a rebellion launched from Texas soil against the Diaz government in Mexico in 1891, and Continental Crossroads (Duke University Press, 2004), which presents a series of essays on borderlands history. Young’s new research project focuses on the Chinese diaspora in Cuba, Mexico, Canada, and the U.S. in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His Conversation Project program draws on this historical research as a basis for asking questions about our current economy and the communities we would like to build. He earned his BA from Princeton University and his master’s and doctoral degrees in Latin American history from the University of Texas, Austin.

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The Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. Conversations are facilitated by some of Oregon’s most respected humanities scholars.

For more information, contact John Smith at 503-570-1594.

The Conversation Project: Beyond Bars

The Conversation Project, presented by Oregon Humanities, continues on Wednesday, December 16, with a conversation on “Beyond Bars: Revisioning the Prison System.” This conversation will be presented by Portland State University Professor Walidah Imarisha for free from 6:30-8:00  p.m. in the Library’s Oak Room.

About the conversation:

What is the role that prisons serve in our country? Is it possible to envision a world where people are safe and secure and where there is accountability, but without a reliance on a prison system that may not reduce crime but, in some cases, actually cause it? Participants in this program will begin by exploring what they know about prisons. After a brief multimedia history of prisons and alternative justice systems, Walidah Imarisha, author and adjunct professor in Portland State University’s Black Studies Department, will lead a conversation about alternatives to incarceration.

About the presenter:

Walidah Imarisha has researched prison issues for more than ten years. She helped found the Human Rights Coalition, a prisoners’ family organization in Pennsylvania that now has three chapters. She has also facilitated writing workshops in correctional facilities and public schools. Imarisha was a founding editor of AWOL Magazine and co-edited the 9/11 anthology Another World is Possible. She developed and guest edited an edition of Left Turn Magazine that focused on alternatives to incarceration. Imarisha is an adjunct professor in Portland State University’s black studies department.

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The Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. Conversations are facilitated by some of Oregon’s most respected humanities scholars.

For more information, contact John Smith at 503-570-1594.

The Conversation Project: “Night of a Thousand Stars” rescheduled

The Conversation Project topic “Night of a Thousand Stars: A Portrait of Life in Iraq” presented by photojournalist Joel Smith, which was originally scheduled for Wednesday, December 2, has been rescheduled for Wednesday, February 10.

We ap0logize for any inconvenience and hope to see you at the February 10 event!

Join the conversation on November 18

The Conversation Project, presented by Oregon Humanities, kicks off a six conversation series on Wednesday, November 18, with a conversation on “Marking Our Territory: How to Read Local Landscapes.”
This conversation will be presented by Lewis & Clark College Professor Reiko Hillyer for free from 6:30-8:00  p.m. in the Library’s Oak Room.

About the conversation: The big house and the quarters; the front door and the back door; lunch counters, water fountains, the back of the bus. One of the most persistent ways people exert power over others is to control their access to space. Drawing upon the fields of architecture, environmental studies, urban design, and public policy, this discussion will pose the following questions: How do we mark our territory? How do the built environments we create reflect our values and aspirations? Whom do we include and whom de we exclude in the process? Touching on gentrification, the decline of public space, historic preservation, residential segregation, and suburban sprawl, Reiko Hillyer will lead a conversation about how to reading the history of our communities through the landscapes we build and consider how we can be more aware of and more engaged in the creation of our surroundings.

About the presenter: Reiko Hillyer is a visiting assistant professor of history at Lewis & Clark College, where she recently won the Teacher of the Year award. She teaches twentieth-century U.S. history, African American history, the Civil War, women’s history, and the history of the American landscape. Her current book project, Designing Dixie: Landscape, Tourism, and Memory in the New South, 1870-1941, explores the era following the Civil War and examines the role that northern tourism to the South played in fostering reconciliation between North and South. Formerly a high school history teacher and guide for Big Onion Walking Tours in New York City, Hillyer is a lifelong New Yorker who is still adjusting to the calm of Portland. She received her BA from Yale University and her doctorate from Columbia University.

The Conversation Project: A New Chautauqua offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future. Conversations are facilitated by some of Oregon’s most respected humanities scholars.

For more information, contact John Smith at 503-570-1594.